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Category Archives: Counseling & Coaching

Counseling amidst the Coronavirus: While video sessions are good, nothing can replace face-to-face sessions.

Counseling & Coaching, Uncategorized0 comments

Image by Grief Recovery Center from Pixabay

After nearly two months of being locked down and tucked away in my home office, I finally saw my first client in-person this week.  While some clients are more cautious and have no issues with teletherapy, others have been asking if they could see me in-person.

So with a few safety adjustments to my office (mainly ensuring 6 feet of distance between us, requiring hand-washing of clients, etc.), I re-opened with little fanfare.  But what was noticeable was how alive, energized, and rejuvenated I felt compared to the endless Zoom sessions I’ve been accustomed to that left me emotionally and physically drained, depleted, and exhausted.

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Domestic Violence amidst a Pandemic: It includes “non-violent” behaviors too.

Counseling & Coaching0 comments

Photo by Sydney Sims on Unsplash

When you ask people to describe what domestic violence is, most will say it involves physical violence of some sort (i.e. hitting, slapping, kicking, shoving).  But what most people don’t realize (including therapists), is there’s a number of other areas that are included in domestic violence also known as intimate partner violence (IPV), where the victim is never touched.

Now more than ever, as we are in the midst of a pandemic, the public needs to be aware of what domestic violence is as rates have surged due to stay at home protocols that limit a victim from accessing shelters and escaping an abusive home and relationship.

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Pride: The biggest challenge to addiction recovery.

Addictions, Asian Shame, Counseling & Coaching0 comments

Photo by Dev Benjamin on Unsplash

As a psychotherapist who works in the addiction field, denial is often cited as one of the biggest reasons for not getting help. While I agree denial is a huge barrier to recovery, it doesn’t quite encapsulate the condition which keeps someone in denial.

To truly get to the heart of the issue, we need to explore how pride or ego (in contemporary parlance) infects each and every one of us, but especially those suffering from addiction. The pride I’m describing is not the healthy version where one can be proud of a job well done or one’s accomplishments. Instead, the pride that can seep into the soul in a harmful way. In addiction work, pride makes itself known when one proclaims, “I can do this on my own,” “I don’t need help,” or “I don’t need God.”  

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5 Ways to Recover from Infidelity

Addictions, Asian Shame, Counseling & Coaching, Dating1 comment

Dave Emmett of PhotoPin

One of the most devastating emotional, physical, and spiritualwounds in a coupleship is when cheating occurs.  Once this is discovered, the betrayed partner wants to know the truth while the offending partner may acknowledge the infidelity but is fearful of sharing more lest the relationship end in a divorce, separation, or break-up.

As a psychotherapist who specializes in sexual and cultural issues, here are 5 areas that are recommended for the relationship to get the healing it deserves in times of infidelity.

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Japanese Shame of Sleeping: How Asian Cultural Shame leads to Workaholism and Sleep-Deprivation.

Asian Shame, Counseling & Coaching, Uncategorized0 comments

In many Asian cultures, work is equated with one’s worth.  Work is perceived with reverence and cultural honor even if it supersedes your mental or physical health.  For the Japanese, extolling work is evident as the country ranks as the most sleep-deprived nation of the world getting just more than 6 hours of rest a night.

The average person in Japan sleeps just 6 hours and 15 minutes at night, an hour less than in the U.S. and Switzerland, according to a recent Wall Street Journal article.  This puts Japan at the bottom of its list of developed countries.

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